Are You Still Watching?

My Top 5 Sustainability and Low Waste Living Documentaries on Netflix

I’ve written before about various documentaries that I have found useful in my low waste journey. I regularly have weeks where the only things that I want to watch are documentaries and as such have been through my fair share of them. I’ve even been asked by my friends to provide them with recommendations multiple times, so I thought that i’d give these recommendations to you guys too. Here are my top 5 documentaries (in no particular order) related to sustainability, low waste living and thoughtful shopping.

Minimalism

I’ve spoken about this one multiple times in previous posts, in fact it’s this documentary that inspired me to start this blog in the first place. Minimalism follows the Minimalists as they travel around America to promote their new book and their lifestyle. It also contains interviews with other people who have decided to reduces their consumption and reject the capitalist lifestyle that we’ve all been taught to strive for. This documentary focuses more on minimalism as a lifestyle that values time and relationships over physical belongings as opposed to minimalism as an aesthetic. Whilst on the surface this may note seem overly related to low waste living, the minimalist lifestyle is in itself very low impact. By buying and owning fewer items you generate less waste.

The True Price

This one may not initially strike you as a low waste documentary but it definitely made me rethink the way that I shop for and use clothes. The True Price is a documentary about the impact that the fashion industry has on the environment and on the people in third world countries. People that have to make clothes in appalling conditions just so that we can spend £2 on a t-shirt that we’re only going to wear once. It forces you to think about your relationship with retail and about how capitalism and constant advertising is affecting the way we live our lives. This documentary was the catalyst for my ‘Impact of Fast Fashion’ post.

Fed Up

Fed Up is a low waste documentary in that it will hopefully make you think twice about what you are buying at the supermarket. Heavily processed foods are everywhere on our shelves and it should come as no surprise that they are one of the main causes of rampant obesity. What may be more surprising is how far companies are going to try and steer us in the wrong direction, so that they can continue to sell us these unhealthy diets. I myself try to go for the organic range, and have even made steps to try and grow most of my own food myself, but I know that that is not an option for everyone, so hopefully this documentary can give you a more solid footing for the next time you go grocery shopping.

Cowspiracy

Cowspiracy takes a similar tone to Blackfish, in that it tackles something that most of us are aware of but don’t really want to think about. The impact that widespread animal agriculture is having on our planet, and on us. From the amount of water it takes to raise a cow for slaughter, to the amount of greenhouse gasses emitted by ‘big dairy’ Cowspiracy focuses mostly on how we should cut back on our meat consumption if we want to save the planet. Much like Fed Up, Cowspiracy also looks into the impact that our current diet is having on our health, and on the efforts that food corporations are going to in order to hide this from us.

Sustainable

Last but not least on this list is Sustainable. Sustainable is much less of a downer about food and the fate of the planet than the last three documentaries on this list, in fact its tone is much closer to Minimalism. Sustainable follows the rising trend of sustainable farming, mostly in America but in other parts of the world as well. Much like my ‘Go Old School for Low Waste’ post, many of the practices in this documentary are taken from old style agriculture. The dismissal of mono-crops, rotating seasonal foods, focusing more on natural resistances than pesticides etc. It also poses the questions, can we farm sustainably and still provide enough food to feed everyone? The answer that this documentary gives us is that not only can sustainable farming produce enough food to feed everyone, but it can do it much better than current farming practices are.

I hope this list has given you a good starting block of extra material to help you on your low waste journey, or just help you to educate yourselves on alternative ways of living. If anyone has any further recommendations then please leave a comment or email at jade.musto@livinglightergoinggreener.co.uk and i’ll check them out and maybe make another post like this in the future.

Never fear failure

There have been times in the past when I have slipped up and bought something super wasteful. For example, a few days ago I went out shopping and realised that i’d left my reusable shopping bag at home and on top of that it was super hot and I hadn’t bought a drink or bottle with me. One plastic water bottle and plastic bag later I returned home filled with guilt and feeling like i’d set myself back months. How can I run this blog where I tell people to reduce their waste and shop smart when i’m not doing it myself?

But the thing is, everybody makes mistakes. I have been consistently cutting down on the amount of wasteful things that I buy and use, in fact i’ve drastically cut down on my shopping in general. It got me to thinking, there are so many people out there, me being one of them, who start something and then drop it when they make a mistake. Or don’t even start because they are afraid that they’ll fail. I can’t tell you how long it took me to start this blog because I wanted to get it perfect on the first try. Now I can’t say that it is perfect but at least i’ve started, and I am very proud of what i’m doing and I believe that it’s helping people.

The thing with low waste living, as with most lifestyle changes, is that it takes time. You’re bound to mess up from time to time and that’s okay. As long as your aware of it, and learn from it. It’s a constant learning and growing experience and, at least for me, its helping me to finally try the things I was never brave enough to before. The thing to remember is that just because there is the capacity for failure doesn’t mean it’s not worth doing, if you never start something then you have already failed.