A walk interrupted

Last week I had a mid-week day off and with it being super-hot and sunny outside I decided to take my camera and go for a hike. I went to a local beauty spot called the Washpool to sit and listen to the gently running water and recuperate in nature. However, my tranquil day out was somewhat marred by the amount of litter I found during my walk. As removed from civilisation as my destination was it wasn’t immune from the detritus of human waste, I found numerous plastic bags, pieces of paper and what seemed to be the remains of a tennis ball stuck in trees and languishing precariously close to the beautiful waterway.

This comes with little shock as recent studies have found that 80% of UK rivers and water bodies have microplastics in them, invisible to the naked eye but dangerous as they can harbour harmful bacteria and easily make it into our food stream.

What did surprise me however was that despite all of this litter there were numerous bins on the hiking trail for people to put their rubbish. How lazy do you have to be to drop your dogs poo bag, or an old receipt when there’s a bin less than 5 metres away. I can give the benefit of the doubt to some of the small bags that were caught on fences as this walk is on a quite exposed part of a hill where the wind can be quite strong, they may have been blown out of someone’s hands and out of sight before it was possible to catch them. What I can’t understand is the full poo bags I found ties to tree branches, what is the though process there?

I guess my few take-aways from this short semi-rant are this:

  • if you are going to create rubbish when you are out and about, especially when you are out in nature then there is no justification for not holding onto that rubbish until you can safely dispose of it.
  • If you find rubbish whilst you are out and about only pick it up if it is safe to do so. E.g. There are no sharp/broken bits, there are no body fluids (human or otherwhys) on it, and there is no danger involved in reaching it.

Ecobricks – A Review

What are Ecobricks:

Ecobricks are a way of safely disposing of/ reusing waste plastic and other non-biological products that cannot be recycled. Ecobricks are made by packing these waste items into plastic bottles until you reach a set density. These ecobricks can them be used to make lego-like modular structures such as furniture, walls and even buildings. These cheap and resistant building materials allow for the building of durable and affordable items whilst simultaneously helping to reduce waste.

Pros:

I believe many of the pros of this product speak for themselves. It’s a great way to find a use for something that was originally useless e.g. waste packaging. It helps us to keep plastic and other harmful materials out of the environment, and it allows for the building of affordable homes all across the world. Plastic is non-biodegradable which means that once made it will never break down in the way that organic material such as wood will, there are pros and cons to this. The Pros are that plastic items last for a really long time, but one the item become obsolete or not longer wanted then this pro turns into a con. Ecobricks is a solution to this as it puts the utility of long-lasting durability back into waste plastic. Ecobricks keeps plastic out of our environment and helps to protect vulnerable flora and fauna. The very process of creating an ecobrick also helps to raise individual consciousness of the environmental problem that plastic creates, by taking the time to collect the waste that you have created and pack it into an ecobrick you can see how much you actually produce and take steps to minimise this.

Cons:

The final point in my pro list also leads onto my first and really only con. The possibility of this becoming an easy out for people. By making ecobricks I am concerned that people will make no further steps to change their behaviour, people may start to think, ‘well my waste plastic is now going somewhere useful so why should I stop buying it?’ What we really should be aiming for is a culture and a lifestyle where ecobricks are not needed, where we are not producing such high levels of environmentally harmful, pointless plastic. Whilst individuals may make changes once ecobricks has caused them to think more critically about their consumption, the large corporations that produce these plastics may very well use ecobricks and solutions like them as a way of justifying their continued existence.

Would I recommend:

As the pros of Ecobricks far outweigh the cons (which are also currently just conjecture on my part, I have no data to prove that Ecobricks will not cause a drop in the production of useless plastic) I would highly recommend checking out the Ecobricks website and look into creating some yourself.

If you liked this review style post and would like to see more focusing on specific products and movements then please drop a comment below or on our facebook page.

The 11th Hour

Yesterday over 1 million young people around the world skipped school and took to the streets to strike for climate action. According to organizers there were more than 2,000 protests in 125 countries. This global movement has been inspired by Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old who has sat outside of Swedish parliament every Friday since August.

Greta Thunberg, as well as many young people, is angry at the lack of action taken by governments and companies to put in place more concrete action plans to help put a stop to catastrophic climate change.

This increase in rage, fear and disappointment in students and many people in their mid-late 20s has come after the UNs warning that we only have 12 years to keep global temperatures to a maximum of 1.5C higher than now. If significant changes are not made and global temperatures go past this 1.5 degree maximum, climate scientists have said that the world will become increasingly inhospitable.

We will see an increase in extreme weather conditions, such as droughts, floods and storms. It should come as no surprise that if this continues, the poorest people and nations will be the most harshly affected, with an increase in food shortages and more chances of flooding. Sea level rises will affect more than 10 million people by 2100 with continued land-ice melt.

These statistics should be shocking enough to inspire action from anyone, however most large companies have done very little to reduce their climatic impact as it will reduce their short-term profits. And many governments have also been very lax in their action plans, giving conservative goals that don’t come close to reducing emissions and pollution to the extent that we need.

Students and young people are rightly angry and indignant about this lack of action as they will be the ones that have to live with the consequences of whatever global governments decide to do, or not do. And as an extra slap in the face many of these students are too young to have a say in what happens, vote whys. Thankfully, as we have seen with the student strikes for gun control after Parkland, the massive turnouts for the womens marches etc, this new generation are ready to fight for what this world needs.

Now for those of us who have a vote, it is vital that we use it to appoint people who will take responsibility for this planet and its people. We also need to start supporting our young people in their crusade, change your lifestyles to reduce your individual impact, sign petitions for concrete action, and join any future marches that may come about. We truly are at the 11th hour and our plant needs us, we have failed her. We have set our house on fire and left our children to put it out, it’s time to take responsibility and rebuild a world that we can be proud to pass on to the next generation.

Plastic Free Communities

Plastic Free Cheltenham

Two Wednesdays ago I went to a ‘Plastic Free Cheltenham’ open meeting. Plastic Free Communities is a movement created by Surfers against Sewage in the UK and has spread over the country. Currently there are 448 plastic free communities in the UK, with the goal of reducing the sale and distribution of single use plastics in an area. During this meeting we were told that the main focuse of Plastic Free Cheltenham is to reach out to local businesses and get them to pledge to remove at least 3 single use plastics from their shelves. Coffee cups, plastic straws, plastic bags etc. The other focuses are increasing public knowledge through educations, in schools, at festivals etc, and cleaning up your local area.

The Last Straw

During the open meeting we had a speech from a local awareness business called ‘The Last Straw’. Run by two brothers in secondary school, their aim is to offer sustainable, cheap alternatives to plastic straw’s. They currently sell bamboo and wheat straws, and approach businesses across Gloucestershire to try and get them to switch to these reusable alternatives.
After the meeting I approached the brothers and asked them to say a few words about who they are and why they are doing what they are doing and the gave me this response:

‘We started this as a challenge to do something on our behalf to save the environment. This is our mother earth and we need to do something to protect it. On our own we can t make a huge difference but if everybody did something small together we can make a large difference.
What motivates us is our passion for the environment and our love of nature and the need to feel we have to protect it. Our parents guide and support us and we have seen just by making a few changes in our own household we can make such a big difference eg we have now switched to bamboo toothbrushes, we now use beeswax wraps to pack our lunches in instead of foil or clingfilm, we all have refillable water bottles and we try to buy fruit and veg loose as much as we can. If we can do so can you! Replacing your straws with reusable ones is just the start we want to see individuals and businesses making as well. We looked at this and decided not to go for paper straws as they lead to deforestation whereas bamboo is one of the fastest growing plants and does not need to be replanted as it self generates from its own roots. It does not need fertilisers or large amounts of water either and is highly sustainable. Our bamboo straws are 100% degradable and reusable. We also supply wheat straws which are by products of wheat harvest and the stems would normally have been burnt leading to gas emissions so converting them into straws is ideal. They are 100% degradable too.’

Now some of you may be concerned, as I was, that wheat straws would be unusable for people with a wheat intolerance but they assured me that as they are made from wheat by products they can be used by everyone.

The Litter Pick

One of the ways in which Plastic Free Cheltenham are helping in cleaning up our community is by performing organised litter picks. The first of these litters picks happened this Saturday, over 50 individuals turned up to help us clean up our streets. We went in groups of 4 and moved street by street for 2 hours picking up discarded waste and marking down how much of each type of waste we collected. Unsurprisingly the most common form of litter that we found was cigarette butts, what was more surprising though was the sheer amount of them, we couldn’t move two steps without finding a discarded cigarette butt. Some unusual forms of rubbish that we found included, school trousers, a cut up credit card, and a large part of a car door!

Below are some photos of the bags of rubbish that we collected in our 2 hour stint.

Why not check out if there are any plastic free communities near you, and if there isn’t why not become a plastic free ambassador and create your own community.

Let Your Hobbies be Hobbies

Whilst I will be back to writing more environmental based posts, product reviews and the like I wanted to take this time to write about something that i’ve been thinking about for a while. Almost a follow on from my last post about allowing yourself to just relax and do nothing. I wanted to talk about our societies current obsession with monetising hobbies. Now I do subscribe to the ‘if you’re good at something then never do it for free’ to some extent, namely if you are doing something all the time and you are given the opportunity to make some money with it then why not?

The thing that I have issue with however is the idea that doing something you enjoy is only worth it if you can make money from it, and by extension it’s only worth doing if you are really good at it. I know that i’m not the only person who has given up on something because I wasn’t ‘good’ at it, even things that I really enjoyed. And those things that I am good at, I have felt like I should be trying to make money with it, or what’s the point of continuing to do it?

This, I believe, is indicative of how out current society only places emphasis on doing things that can be made profitable. Do you enjoy crafts? Well then you should be selling them. Do you like art? Then you should be taking commissions. And if the thing you enjoy is not marketable then why are you doing it? Why are you doing something just because you enjoy it? Why are you not being more productive? It’s these kind of insidious beliefs that can stop us from continuing or even starting something that we really enjoy.

I’ve felt this similar pressure with writing this blog, I want to do a good job and I want to spread useful information and opinions to those of you who want to live a lower waste life. But the pressure to try and do it so often and make money off of it has sucked some of the fun out of it and has led me to posting some posts that I wasn’t 100% happy with. I want to keep up some semblance of an upload schedule with this blog, and I have more posts planned out but i’m going to be spending more time ensuring that i’m enjoying writing these, and that they’re up to a good enough standard before I post them. If some time in the future this blog becomes popular enough to become a source of income for me then great, but that’s not going to be my main focus.

Instead i’m going to let my hobbies continue to be hobbies, something that I do to unwind, something that makes me happy, something that I don’t have to be perfect at.