Cross Generational Conversation

As time has gone on and I’ve looked further into low waste alternatives the comments I usually get are along the lines of ‘we used to have that’ or ‘that’s not a new idea’. And this is true, the culture of disposability is a recently new one, in past decades single use items were seen to be as wasteful as they really are.

As plastic, low quality alternatives became easier to obtain and markedly cheaper in the short term the higher quality, longer lasting staples became increasingly scarce. It’s has gotten to the point where for many of my generation and below that the idea of reusable nappies, reusable makeup wipes etc seem like a new invention.

This is why cross generational conversation is one of the most important things for this movement. I have gotten some of my best tips and ideas from people in older generations, and I like to think that people like me can offer a fresh perspective to others.

There are many places and events where people from different backgrounds and generations can meet and chat.

Repair Cafes

These are becoming more and more prevalent as people try to save money and make their electronics last longer. It’s also a great place to learn a skill.

Eco Meetings

Places like the Plastic Free meetings that I have been attending always have a healthy mix of people with a passion for doing what they can to improve their local area.

Fairs and Festivals

As we move into the summer food and drinks fairs will begin popping up. Whilst I have yet to see a zero waste fair, Vegan festivals and agricultural fairs often have interesting alternatives to try and plenty of people to meet.

When surrounded by people who are content with throwing away it can feel like a bit of a loosing battle trying to live low waste. Gathering with people that are of a similar mindset, whether it be at a Café, a festival, or a march, can be refreshing and downright enjoyable. If you do go to one of these gatherings be sure to engage, the Zero Waste Movement is all about sharing and increasing awareness, so share. Share your knowledge, your ideas and experiences, give people tips and take them in return.

 

Respect in the wake of Summer

As we move further into the summer and people are starting to spend more time outside among nature I thought I’d impart a few tips and tricks on how you can help improve your local environment.

1. Feed the Bees

As the weather turns warmer, we should start seeing more of our cute buzzy friends floating about, however the mornings are still cool and a suddenly cold day can badly effect the health and stamina of bumblebees. Keep an eye out for any little ladies that seem sluggish or who are wandering around on the floor, it could be that they’re hungry and tired. Even if you find what looks like a dead bee give her a gentle push to see if she’s simply exhausted, if you can find a leaf and pop her on a flower. The best flowers for a tired bee are tube/cup shaped ones which give them an easy place to sit and rest whilst they fill up on pollen. If you’re near home or can’t find a flower then try to give them a small piece of fruit or a teaspoon of sugar water, this should give them enough energy to get on their way.

Top tip: Sugar water should be given as a last resort as it is the human equivalent of junk food. It will give a bee enough energy to get home but its highly addictive and honey made from sugar water has little to no nutritional value for larvae.

2. Don’t feed the ducks (at least don’t feed them bread)

Going to feed the ducks was always a childhood favourite of mine, it also served as a good way to get rid of stale bread. Unfortunately, this is one of the worse things to feed birds, not just ducks. Bread has almost no nutritional benefit and instead fills a birds stomach, reducing the space for beneficial food. This is especially dangerous during the winter when other food is scarce and birds need to bulk up to keep warm, another dangerous time period is in he spring when ducks and other water birds have young with them. Feeding young ducklings bread can actually lead to them starving to death, because they feel full and therefore don’t eat food with actually nutritional benefit.

Top tip: Try taking some baby carrots, seeds, sweetcorn and other vegetables that give a nice crunch the next time that you want to feed the ducks. These are much healthier and a lot more fun for young ducklings to eat.

3. Take nothing but photos leave nothing but footprints

Many of you will have heard this adage and as we hear more and more about the amount of plastic and rubbish that has made its way into the environment I feel as though its more important than ever.

What this saying means is if you take something into an environment that doesn’t belong there, food, packaging etc. it is your job to take them back out again. In the simplest terms, don’t litter.

The take nothing but photos part of this saying is slightly more of a grey area, this part really means don’t take anything that will disturb then environment that you’ve visited or harm the environment that you are taking it to. A pretty autumn leaf, a nice pebble from the beach, these things are not going to cause any negative impact. Taking seeds from a plant into a non-native environment, uprooting a whole plant, taking a pretty birds egg, these things can cause quite a bit of damage to the delicate ecosystems where they naturally exist. This is one of the main reasons why customs are so strict on bringing biological material into different countries, a quick google on invasive species will show you how quickly foreign plants and animals can destroy a well-balanced ecosystem.

Final Thoughts

The biggest take home for this post is respect. When you are out and about in nature, respect it. Take time to look out for wildlife that may need your help and keep your distance from other things that shouldn’t be disturbed. Remember that you are a guest in these places that you visit, so give it the same level of respect that you would a loved ones house.

The Living Lighter Store – A New Site

Those of you who have been visiting this blog regularly may have noticed that our site notice and links have disappeared. That is because as of now the Living Lighter Store has its own website www.livinglighterstore.co.uk where you can pick up everything you need to start living low waste. Along with our Hydrophil toothbrushes and soap pouches we will soon be selling bees wax wraps! an eco-friendly alternative to cling-film. We will also be selling the none-sponge and re-usable makeup pads and nail pads. Why not check out our new site and then drop us a comment telling us what you think?

A walk interrupted

Last week I had a mid-week day off and with it being super-hot and sunny outside I decided to take my camera and go for a hike. I went to a local beauty spot called the Washpool to sit and listen to the gently running water and recuperate in nature. However, my tranquil day out was somewhat marred by the amount of litter I found during my walk. As removed from civilisation as my destination was it wasn’t immune from the detritus of human waste, I found numerous plastic bags, pieces of paper and what seemed to be the remains of a tennis ball stuck in trees and languishing precariously close to the beautiful waterway.

This comes with little shock as recent studies have found that 80% of UK rivers and water bodies have microplastics in them, invisible to the naked eye but dangerous as they can harbour harmful bacteria and easily make it into our food stream.

What did surprise me however was that despite all of this litter there were numerous bins on the hiking trail for people to put their rubbish. How lazy do you have to be to drop your dogs poo bag, or an old receipt when there’s a bin less than 5 metres away. I can give the benefit of the doubt to some of the small bags that were caught on fences as this walk is on a quite exposed part of a hill where the wind can be quite strong, they may have been blown out of someone’s hands and out of sight before it was possible to catch them. What I can’t understand is the full poo bags I found ties to tree branches, what is the though process there?

I guess my few take-aways from this short semi-rant are this:

  • if you are going to create rubbish when you are out and about, especially when you are out in nature then there is no justification for not holding onto that rubbish until you can safely dispose of it.
  • If you find rubbish whilst you are out and about only pick it up if it is safe to do so. E.g. There are no sharp/broken bits, there are no body fluids (human or otherwhys) on it, and there is no danger involved in reaching it.

Ecobricks – A Review

What are Ecobricks:

Ecobricks are a way of safely disposing of/ reusing waste plastic and other non-biological products that cannot be recycled. Ecobricks are made by packing these waste items into plastic bottles until you reach a set density. These ecobricks can them be used to make lego-like modular structures such as furniture, walls and even buildings. These cheap and resistant building materials allow for the building of durable and affordable items whilst simultaneously helping to reduce waste.

Pros:

I believe many of the pros of this product speak for themselves. It’s a great way to find a use for something that was originally useless e.g. waste packaging. It helps us to keep plastic and other harmful materials out of the environment, and it allows for the building of affordable homes all across the world. Plastic is non-biodegradable which means that once made it will never break down in the way that organic material such as wood will, there are pros and cons to this. The Pros are that plastic items last for a really long time, but one the item become obsolete or not longer wanted then this pro turns into a con. Ecobricks is a solution to this as it puts the utility of long-lasting durability back into waste plastic. Ecobricks keeps plastic out of our environment and helps to protect vulnerable flora and fauna. The very process of creating an ecobrick also helps to raise individual consciousness of the environmental problem that plastic creates, by taking the time to collect the waste that you have created and pack it into an ecobrick you can see how much you actually produce and take steps to minimise this.

Cons:

The final point in my pro list also leads onto my first and really only con. The possibility of this becoming an easy out for people. By making ecobricks I am concerned that people will make no further steps to change their behaviour, people may start to think, ‘well my waste plastic is now going somewhere useful so why should I stop buying it?’ What we really should be aiming for is a culture and a lifestyle where ecobricks are not needed, where we are not producing such high levels of environmentally harmful, pointless plastic. Whilst individuals may make changes once ecobricks has caused them to think more critically about their consumption, the large corporations that produce these plastics may very well use ecobricks and solutions like them as a way of justifying their continued existence.

Would I recommend:

As the pros of Ecobricks far outweigh the cons (which are also currently just conjecture on my part, I have no data to prove that Ecobricks will not cause a drop in the production of useless plastic) I would highly recommend checking out the Ecobricks website and look into creating some yourself.

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